The Choice to Ignore

Finally, a device that enables hard of hearing computer users to choose who they want to ignore in cyberspace. Most hard of hearing people are used to being tethered to portable devices like their mobile or cordless phone. People without hearing difficulties never worry about missing a text, call, or email should they wander a […]

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Thank You Jonathan Price

The walls were institutional green and smoke danced in slivers of sunlight that peeked in between the horizontal window blinds. The room was littered with twill-covered sofas and coffee tables were dotted with soda cans, some of which the tabs were broken off in the unspoken symbol of ashtray improvisation. It was the smoking lounge […]

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Love 40

Love means nothing. Zip, zilch, zero, or “l’oeuf” as the French would say. Actually the French haven’t called “nothing” a “l’oeuf”, or “egg”, since the origins of scoring in tennis. And they still don’t; only American tennis refers to zero as “Love” (sounds like l’oeuf”) when scoring a game, and it is also said to […]

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Futures-R-Us

Every June I want to quit my job. This  is tied to my romantic attachment of  having summers off from school. Every June I look back and feel nostalgic, look forward and feel nervous. When my brother graduated college seven years ago, I wrote a blog  that I hoped would share some wisdom and express my concerns […]

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The Language of Healthcare

Dr. Danielle Ofri is the kind of doctor most people would want to take care of them. She fights convention and spends more than the allotted 15 minutes with each patient, frets over their well-being long after their office visits have completed, agonizes over her ethical responsibilities both to her employer (Bellevue Hospital) and especially […]

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Call Me Shapash

A pale pink, half-moon shaped scar sits above my left breast as a reminder of my youth spent at Jones Beach with more baby oil than sunscreen, doing more baking than bathing. My scar is from having MOHS micrographic surgery, after basal cell carcinoma was found in a biopsy of a mole. Basal cell carcinoma […]

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Fear of Flying

In 1980 Boeing researchers found that 18.1% adults in the U.S. were afraid to fly, and another 12.6% experienced anxiety when they fly. In 1999, a Newsweek poll found 50% of the adults surveyed who flew commercial airlines were frightened at least sometimes. This makes sense. I am not afraid of flying, but always say […]

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Breathe Easy

The government is monitoring and restricting my consumption of Advil Cold & Sinus©, and it is all Japan’s fault. A Japanese chemist first synthesized ephedrine into Methamphetamine in 1893. Twenty-six years later, another chemist produced a crystallized form of methamphetamine, known on the streets as “crystal meth.” Three years after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, […]

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The Art of Bouncing

Resiliency is defined as “the power or ability to return to the original form, position, etc., after being bent, compressed, or stretched; elasticity; or ability to recover readily from illness, depression, adversity, or the like; buoyancy”. On Wednesday night, the German women bobsledding champions Cathleen Martini and Romy Logsch were trying to improve the time […]

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